May 13, 2018

Karla Estrada: “After DACA It’s Like We (the movement) Stopped Fighting”

Karla Estrada: “After DACA It’s Like We (the movement) Stopped Fighting”

Welcome Karla Estrada (@undocutravelers) to this week’s Immigration MIC (California Edition!) Episode: “After DACA, it’s like we (the movement) stopped fighting” In this two hour conversation we discuss: 🔵Karla talks about her identity, and how she struggles internally with her family’s lineage 🔴Having been born premature, along with financial struggles, being the factors that led to her family migrating to the US. ⚫️The challenges of growing up with her parents working, and her and her brother experiencing abusive behavior from their hired caretaker. 🔵Her love for theater in school, being able to touch people by playing different characters, and her favorite play (Les Miserables) 🔴The moment that she first experienced shame for her immigration status: a counselor that told her she should “go back to Mexico” instead of going to college. ⚫️Attending community college, and finding a community of other undocumented students, and collectively pioneering a growing movement in 2009. 🔵The transition from the “DREAMer” narrative, to disruptive actions after the failure of the passage of the DREAM Act in 2010. 🔴Creating the first known step by step online guide to Advance Parole (which thousands have benefited from since), and her amazing experience of studying abroad in Italy. ⚫️“After DACA passed, we stopped fighting. A lot of people retired, and came back when Trump was about to be elected.” 🔵Her work in asylum efforts, and how the current administration’s policy changes are damaging structures/ programs, impacting thousands of refugees. And much, much, much more, you need to hear!

Welcome Karla Estrada (@undocutravelers) to this week’s Immigration MIC (California Edition!)

Episode: “After DACA, it’s like we (the movement) stopped fighting”

In this two hour conversation we discuss:

🔵Karla talks about her identity, and how she struggles internally with her family’s lineage

🔴Having been born premature, along with financial struggles, being the factors that led to her family migrating to the US.

⚫️The challenges of growing up with her parents working, and her and her brother experiencing abusive behavior from their hired caretaker.

🔵Her love for theater in school, being able to touch people by playing different characters, and her favorite play (Les Miserables)

🔴The moment that she first experienced shame for her immigration status: a counselor that told her she should “go back to Mexico” instead of going to college.

⚫️Attending community college, and finding a community of other undocumented students, and collectively pioneering a growing movement in 2009.

🔵The transition from the “DREAMer” narrative, to disruptive actions after the failure of the passage of the DREAM Act in 2010.

🔴Creating the first known step by step online guide to Advance Parole (which thousands have benefited from since), and her amazing experience of studying abroad in Italy.

⚫️“After DACA passed, we stopped fighting. A lot of people retired, and came back when Trump was about to be elected.”

🔵Her work in asylum efforts, and how the current administration’s policy changes are damaging structures/ programs, impacting thousands of refugees.

And much, much, much more, you need to hear!